July 9th in German History: Prussia Signs the Treaty of Tilsit

Two days ago, I discussed Russia’s treaty with France. That treaty left Russia with its territory and national honor intact. The Prussian treaty, however, was not nearly as lenient. Prussia would suffer perhaps the greatest catastrophe of its history, and was made completely subservient to Napoleon from the signing of the treaty on July 9th,Continue reading “July 9th in German History: Prussia Signs the Treaty of Tilsit”

July 8th in German History: The Birth of Hugo Boss

Hugo Boss is the most famous German fashion designer, the company of the same name that he founded having become a stable of the luxury fashion industry. However, like most famous Germans who lived during and immediately before the Second World War, Boss had an immoral association with Nazism. Huge Boss was born on JulyContinue reading “July 8th in German History: The Birth of Hugo Boss”

July 7th in German History: The Treaty of Tilsit Between France and Russia

The Napoleon Wars saw many defeats for Prussia, and those defeats resulted in crippling losses of territory and manpower. On July 9th, 1807, Prussia signed the humiliating Treaty of Tilsit with France. However, on July 7th, Russia, Prussia’s former ally, signed its own treaty, ending its involvement in the war of the Fourth Coalition. Napoleon’sContinue reading “July 7th in German History: The Treaty of Tilsit Between France and Russia”

July 6th in German History: Regiomontanus Dies

In the long list of German mathematicians, the name Regiomontanus, while not the most mentioned, still receives some mention in history and mathematics courses today. This is hardly surprising given the contributions he made not only to mathematics but also to astronomy. Johannes Müller von Königsberg, known as Regiomontanus, died on July 6th, 1476. RegiomontanusContinue reading “July 6th in German History: Regiomontanus Dies”

July 5th in German History: Germany Gives Austria-Hungary a Black Cheque in Serbia

Few German diplomatic actions are as derided as the “Black Cheque”, the popular term for the promise of support given by Germany to Austria-Hungary in the latter nation’s dealings with Serbia. On July 5th, 1914, German Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg communicated to the Austrian ambassador in Berlin, Count László Szőgyény-Marich de Magyar-Szőgyén et Szolgaegyháza, thatContinue reading “July 5th in German History: Germany Gives Austria-Hungary a Black Cheque in Serbia”

July 3rd in German History: German Forces in Minsk Surrender

In the first few months following the German declaration of war on the Soviet Union, numerous cities fell to the Wehrmacht as it advanced though Soviet Satellite states and into Russia. Minsk, the capitol of the Belarusian SSR, was captured in early July and hundreds of thousands of Soviet troops were killed or captured. ThreeContinue reading “July 3rd in German History: German Forces in Minsk Surrender”

July 2nd in German History: The Knox-Porter Resolution, the US Makes Peace with Germany

One interesting part of World War I history is the US refusal to formally end the war with Germany until 1921. Wanting to return to its isolation from world conflicts, the US refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, which would have made the US a member of the League of Nations. This meant thatContinue reading “July 2nd in German History: The Knox-Porter Resolution, the US Makes Peace with Germany”

July 1st in German History: East Germany Accepts the Deutsche Mark

German Reunification was not one event, rather, a series of steps to reconnect the economies and societies of East and West Germany to make the creation of a united Germany possible. One of the most important of these steps was the introduction of the Deutsche Mark, West Germany’s currency, into East Germany on July 1st,Continue reading “July 1st in German History: East Germany Accepts the Deutsche Mark”

June 30th in German History: The Night of the Long Knives

The Night of the Long Knives was a purge that took place in Nazi Germany in 1934. It began on June 30th and lasted for four days, ending on July 2nd. The purge was carried out by the SS and parts of the police. The main target of the purge was the SA, a NaziContinue reading “June 30th in German History: The Night of the Long Knives”

June 29th in German History: General Ludwig Beck is Born

Something often forgot when studying Nazi Germany is that many of its early supporters turned against the regime as it became more extreme. One such man was Ludwig Beck, a general who was the Chief of the German General Staff. He was born on June 29th, 1880. Ludwig Beck was born in Biebrich in Hesse-Nassau.Continue reading “June 29th in German History: General Ludwig Beck is Born”